What seeds work best?

Growing something from a seed always gives us a sense of achievement. It’s amazing how something so tiny can hold enough information in it to grow something unique. Related plant species all have seeds that look identical. Ever looked at a cauliflower seed, cabbage seed and kohl rabi seed next to each other? They look identical!

When planting anything from seed, there are several factors involved to ensure you get the best results. Here is a short rundown of what we look at in our seeds to get the best results…

1) Fresh is best

Seeds have a shelf life. As they age, they dry out. Some seeds have a harder outer coating and can survive for years or even decades before successfully germinating, while others can only survive until the next growing season.

Because each plant is different, to ensure you have the best germination rate, have the freshest seeds possible. There is nothing wrong with older seed, as long as you realise that you may need to plant more seeds than normal to ensure that enough plants germinate.

2) Open pollinated

When plants flower, they pollinate each other. There are different ways that plants can be pollinated; by wind, insects (not just bees either), self-pollinated or manually.

Open-pollinated essentially means that pollination has occurred naturally and not been interveened with by us well-meaning humans. There are some risks with open-pollination though, namely the fact that related plants may actually contribute pollen to other plants and thus produce a cross breed. Anyone who normally saves seed, needs to ensure that there are no similar plants in the vicinity that will proceed a cross breed.

Some large seed companies purposefully produce cross breeds in their seeds. Corn is the easiest example to find in any seed catalogue. Any seed packet with an “F1” or “F2” label on it means that the seed was produced from a cross breeding of two varieties. If the resulting plant is then left to seed, the seed produced will NOT grow to be exactly like its parent. This means that the seed is not “True to Type”

3) True to Type

This essentially means that the seed will grow to be like its parent. Having cross-pollinated seed is a fun way of having surprises. But if you want to grow something specific, it is a nightmare.

If you are purchasing open-pollinated seeds that are marketed as true to type, the producers have probably gone to extreme lengths to ensure that this is true. Looking at corn again, it is a wind pollinated plant. This means that to have open pollinated corn, you must be confident that there is no corn growing within 1-2km radius. We are lucky enough to be able to do this, which is a bonus!

4) Locally Sourced

A plant that has successfully produced seed in your local area is more likely to produce very hardy offspring that are well suited to your conditions. It may not seem like a significant concern, but it can make a load of difference.

We tend to be a little brutal on the plants that we want to get seeds from. Generally, we grow a crop (usually vegetable, flower or grain crop), and subject it to ideal growth conditions. If a plant is not performing well, it gets culled and the chooks get a feed. Once the seed is starting to set, we then slowly withdraw regular watering from the plant and start to stress the plant a bit. We have found that this technique, while producing fewer seeds than a well tended plant (around 40% of normal) … these seeds will pack a serious punch. Here is a visual example below…

Seedlings - beets Seedlings - brassica

In the seedling trays above, there are two types of seedlings. The first are all beetroot and the second are all broccoli. In the first image, the second row of seedling is far out performing the rest, whereas in the second image, the third and fifth row are outperforming the rest. These rows were grown from seeds that we have produced ourselves and purposefully stressed to local conditions. Need we say more!

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